poetry & song

...now browsing by category

songs and poetry by or about John Roy Stuart

 

Anniversary Cairngorm Walk – 2009 report

Wednesday, August 19th, 2009

According to the Rev William Forsyth, one of John Roy’s men took the ‘Green Banner of Kincardine’ to the summit of Cairngorm on the anniversary of the Raising of the Standard at Glenfinnan 19th August.

Anail a’ Ghaidheil, air a’ mhullach

Walk to the summit of Cairngorm

Saturday 15th August 2009

Deoch-shlainte

Hugh Stewart delivered a short address in Gaelic [with translation] on a theme, taken from the toast below, of the immortality of heroism.  Appropriately enough, that toast was used originally by the Seaforth Highlanders, one of the three regiments in which Hugh served half a century ago.  The Seaforth were numbered among those Highland regiments recruited by former Jacobite ruling families then anxious to ingratiate themselves with the Hanoverian establishment. Many Highlanders were thus enlisted after Wolfe had sought their service in the Seven Years War in Canada/America, with the recommendation that they were “hardy and bold, very patient of cold and hunger, habituated to a rough country and NO GREAT MISCHIEF IF THEY FALL [i.e. expendable]. The toast is made appropriate by replacing the Seaforth slogan “Cabar Feidh” with “An Suaicheantas Ban” as follows:-

Tir nam Beann, nan  Gleann, ’s nan Gaisgeach
Land of mountains, glens and warriors

Far am faighear an t-eun fionn
Where the white bird is got

’S far am faigh am fiadh fasgadh
And where the deer find shelter

Cho fada ’s a chitear ceo mu bheann
So long as mist is seen round a mountain

’S a ruitheas uisge le gleann
And water runs through a glen

Mairidh cuimhne air éuchd nan treun
Memory will endure of the brave’s feats

Slainte agus buaidh gu brath
Health and victory for ever

Le gillean An Suaicheantais Bain!
With the lads of the White Cockade!

An Suaicheantas Ban gu brath!
The White Cockade for ever!

The unmodified toast is still used by the 3rd Battalion the Royal Regiment of Scotland [72, 78, 79 and 92nd]. The regiment at large now sounds like a military millipede after a surfeit of amalgamations. It is collectively the 1st, 21st, 25th, 42nd, 72nd, 74th, 78th, 92nd and 93rd of Foot.

Photos from the day:

The start - photo by Fiona Patrick

Setting off from Glenmore - the JRS anniversary walk- photo by Fiona Patrick

David Kerr and Walter Patrick on the way up Cairngorm - photo: Ann Wakeling

David Kerr and Walter Patrick on the way up - photo: Ann Wakeling

Struggling to hoist the banner! - photo: Stanley Norton

Struggling to hoist the banner! - photo: Stanley Norton

Pete Dutfield struggles to hold the Banner - photo: Ann Wakeling

Pete Dutfield struggles to hold the Banner - photo: Ann Wakeling

Walter, Pete, Mary and David - photo: Ann Wakeling

Walter, Pete, Mary and David - photo: Ann Wakeling

Wind-blown Cuilly Dog

Wind-blown Cuilly Dog near Cairngorm summit- photo: Ann Wakeling

David Kerr, Stan Norton, Ann Wakeling, Pete Dutfield, Mary Mackenzie, Hugh Stewart and Walter Patrick, not forgetting Cuilean Wakeling

David Kerr, Stan Norton, Ann Wakeling, Pete Dutfield, Mary Mackenzie, Hugh Stewart and Walter Patrick, not forgetting Cuilean.

Iain Ruaidh

Monday, August 20th, 2007

A poem celebrating the festival of August 2007.

Iain Ruaidh

Mists swirling round,
Shroud us in time an space.
Transport us back to times long ago.
Though hundreds of years have past,
your names still spoken, your songs sung,
the bard of Cul Lodair, Charlie’s general.
Fer as in yer own words, ‘The Lord’s my Targe’,
you were protected from harm, kept safe, in support of the Prince.

Many died on Cul Lodair’s cold moor,
an in memory of the moment,
Honour of the Prince,
Your banner, musket ridden an tattered,
was tae be carried to the top of blue mountain,
to fly in the winds of time,
its green streaking the sky’s blue,
Flashing defiant and strong.

Today, fer the first time in two hundred and fifty years,
we carried your new banner, proud and strong,
Up Cairngorm’s misty slopes,
To fly in the Highland breeze once more,
In your memory, in your Honour,
A new generation will never forget,
The green once again flashes,
defiant on the breeze.

Iain Ruaidh, red haired John,
you were Prince Charles’ general,
A poet fer the ordinary man.
You sang fer the blindfolded Campbell,
He could not turn you in,
But if his eyes were to meet yours,
the fate of death,
would have been your pay.

You roamed the hills, hid in caves an moors,
Composed songs an poems fine,
an before you left our golden shores,
Your banner you gave in trust,
till the Prince should come once more.
Today your banner flew like the eagle,
high on Cairngorms top,
Defiant in a new world, A link with our past.

Michelle.

Music & Poetry by John Roy

Saturday, August 18th, 2007

John Roy Stuart was a great poet & piper. We aim to present here a selection and review of his surviving works. If you have any information on John Roy, we would love to hear from you – please contact us on info[at]johnroystuart.org.uk

Some links to John Roy’s music and poetry.

John Roy Stuart” composed by Alexander McGlashan (1740-1797)

Two poems by John Roy Stuart on The Gutenberg Project »
(Lament for Lady Macintosh & The Day of Culloden)